Tech Journal #2

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Learning with technology continues to increase across the country as statistics show more and how the impact technology integration has on classroom behavior, engagement, and comprehension. This week, I read several articles about self-regulated learning. Self-regulated learning allows for independence in students. The problem is students do not always ask for help, so it is essential to create an intervention that builds in help-seeking tasks to initiate and demonstrate the importance and payoff to asking questions.

By developing an instructional intervention for incoming college students, students will be able to achieve a college-ready status and ability to enroll in a college-level math class upon successful completion of the summer bridge math class. It is more than just content that must be developed. After reading about self-regulated learning, it is clear that a lot of the self-regulated learning is exactly that, “self”, it is up to the student to seek questions, to overcome their performance-approach mindset. When students feel embarrassed by asking questions, they would rather struggle on their own than to get answers from the immediate source, the instructor.

One strategy provided by Karabenick and Dembo (2011), is to create mastery learning environments:

  • Type of tasks
  • Degree of autonomy or authority learnings have during activities
  • Recognition for learners for their outcomes
  • Grouping practices
  • Evaluation procedures
  • Scheduled time to complete activities

During the process of identifying a performance gap, one thing that stuck out was the amount of time it will take to complete the actual artifact for this concept. It is hard for me to come up with an idea and work through the idea but not develop an artifact that will demonstrate what was originally proposed.

References

Karabenick, S., & Dembo, M. (2011). Understanding and facilitating self‐regulated help seeking. New Directions for Teaching and Learning., 2011(126), 33–43. https://doi.org/10.1002/tl.442

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