Design Journal #5

Some groups have reached near-saturation levels for adoption of basic technologies
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In a post on SHIFT Disruptive ELearning (2015), “When we as commoners think about design, all we think of is superficial things. But design is more than just aesthetics. It involves emotional connect” (Gutierrez, 2015, para. 1). With the number of adults accessing information through a device, specifically a cell phone or smartphone, it is essential instructional design modules are responsive and compatible with various device platforms. As life-long learners, everything we come into contact with is a piece of information that adds to our current knowledge, directly or indirectly. Rather than focusing strictly on the beauty and location of items, it is important to also focus on the emotional and connection of the learner to the material they are learning. When learners are connected to the material they are engaged, inspired, and show a desire to want to learn more.

The term Responsive Design was first coined by the web designer and developer Ethan Marcotte in his book, Responsive Web Design. Responsive designs respond to changes in browser width by adjusting the placement of design elements to fit in the available space.

Instructional Design Foundation. (n.d.). Responsive Design. https://www.interaction-design.org/literature/topics/responsive-design

This week, the goal was to create a responsive project or turn my current project into a responsive project. One thing I learned this week about a responsive project was certain features in Adobe Captivate that worked in an adaptive project did not work in the responsive project and require more time to explore and modify settings. Due to the dimension changes, what is appealing as a desktop version is not as visually appealing or easy to follow on a mobile device.

Spreading the content over several modules can help the designer abide by what Clark and Mayers call, the coherence principle. This is the idea that the lesson must stay decluttered and stay relevant to the main goal (Clark & Mayer, 2016). Each module can highlight a different goal, elicit a different connection to the learner and keep learners engaged progressively in the building of their foundation of knowledge related to a specific topic.

Clark and Mayer (2016) provide three key principles within the coherence principle to avoid

Principle #1: Avoid e-Lessons with Extraneous Words – adding in words that are irrelevant or embellish the lesson is not helpful. Use shorter narrations.

Principle #2: Avoid e-Lessons with Extraneous Graphics – graphics that can be distracting or disruptive to the learning process. Don’t use pictures just to decorate the page or screen because they don’t add to the lesson.

Principles #3: Avoid e-Lessons with Extraneous Audio – applying background music that is irrelevant or at a pace too fast for the material being learned can overload the working memory.

Clark, R. C., Mayer, R. E., (2016). e-learning and the science of instruction: Proven guidelines for consumers and designers of multimedia learning, third edition (4th ed.). San Francisco, Calif: Pfeiffer. 

References

Clark, R. C., Mayer, R. E., (2016). e-learning and the science of instruction: Proven guidelines for consumers and designers of multimedia learning, third edition (4th ed.). San Francisco, Calif: Pfeiffer. 

Instructional Design Foundation. (n.d.). Responsive Design. https://www.interaction-design.org/literature/topics/responsive-design

Pew Research Center. (2016). Internet, social media use and device ownership in U.S. have plateaued after years of growth. Retrieved from https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/09/28/internet-social-media-use-and-device-ownership-in-u-s-have-plateaued-after-years-of-growth/

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